Intro/Day One     Day Two     Day Three     Day Four     Day Five     Day Six    
Day Seven     Day Eight     Day Nine     Day Ten     Reviews     Pictures

Cannes Diary

Entry Four: Thursday, May 16, 2002

Day Two of the Festival
Movies: Killer Tattoo, Plato's Breaking Point, and Star Wars: Episode Two--Attack of the Clones


With the blaring of my alarm at a terribly early time in the morning, the day begins and it’s time to head back over to Unifrance to get the day’s tickets. Luckily, now, there’s an apparent system to the tickets: the Pantiero opens at 9:00am and the Unifrance booth opens at 10:00am. We get to the Pantiero early and wait outside the gates until the whole area opens. At that point, we rush over to the booth and continue our wait there until we’re let in to get our tickets. Today, we’re waiting for Friday’s movies, Bowling for Columbine and All or Nothing. Afterwards, Danny and I grabbed lunch at McDonalds (yes, this would become a theme) and headed off for the next meeting of the trip. We had our first guest speaker, Steve (yeah, don’t remember his last name...sorry), who was involved with the Cinematheque in Toronto and the Toronto Film Festival. He discussed curating festivals and talked about various, less well-known jobs within the film industry. It was interesting because I didn’t know very much about many jobs outside of the creative ones, but this was a good opportunity to learn a little more. After the meeting, Danny and I grabbed lunch in the Palais and headed off to the first two movies of the day.

Killer Tattoo
Thailand, Directed by Yuthlert Sippapak
Riviera 6: 05/16/02: 02:00pm
(*** and 1/2) of four
Time slept during: None

Okay, stay with me here people: so we’re in a post-apocalyptic future and there’s an old assassin named Pae Buffgun. He’s just left prison and takes a job to make some money and begin his big comeback. The job is the assassination of the local police chief known as The Iron Cop. He makes up a motley team including an assassin who thinks he’s Elvis (and wears white suits and talks in broken English), his bomb-expert companion, and another old assassin. The problem is, however, is that Pae Buffgun has accidentally been mistaken for Pae Toughgun, a crazed, extremely deadly professional assassin who also takes the same job. When their paths cross, war breaks out and the body count just keeps on climbing.

There’s the basic plot, but really, following the plot isn’t the point at all of a movie like this. Moving along at a frenetic and chaotic pace, the movie leaps from scene to scene, keeping the viewers constantly wondering what’s coming next and who’s going to die next. Strangely enough, one of the only other movies I could really compare it to is the only other Thai movie I’ve seen, the dark comedy/thriller 69. Tattoo features an insane blend of guns, explosions, blood, and comedy that few others movies can rival (except perhaps some other hyperkinetic Asian films). The movie definitely knows its audience and will certainly appeal to those who know what to expect. After the first 20 minutes, you’ll know for certain whether or not you’ll like the entire movie. My advice, though, is simply not to take it seriously at all, let go, and enjoy. It’s a movie that doesn’t warrant any serious introspection or pondering while you’re watching. In fact, too much time spent trying to make sense of it will just keep you from seeing the next wild action scene. Sippapak never lets the movie get boring and never allows it to get (too) cheesy. It’s one of those movies where you really are laughing with it and not just at it. It’s silly and anarchic, but when you walk out, you’ll be certain that you’ve never seen anything quite like it. Doesn’t that sound refreshing?


Plato’s Breaking Point
England, Directed by Nigel Roffe-Barker
Riviera 04: 05/16/02: 04:00pm
(***) of four
Time slept during: None

The film focuses on two criminals: Plato and his closest friend. Suspected of being involved in multiple bank heists, the two are placed under constant police surveillance. The pressure becomes too much for Plato, though, who soon seems close to cracking. As his world disintegrates around him, Plato finds himself descending more and more into madness and he soon believes that violence is his only way out. The movie is a low-budget DV feature shot in London that really manages to reach outside of its restraints. Roffe-Barker directs with style, keeping the viewer wondering what will happen next. Acting is also excellent, which elevates the movie further since it relies heavily on watching the psychological states of the characters. Though it already runs at a lean 84 minutes, some sequences still seem a bit overlong and I wonder if there isn’t a fantastic 70 minute movie hidden in here somewhere. Additionally, some of the “split-screen” flashy editing seems somewhat misplaced in an altogether non-flashy movie. Still, minor problems can easily be ignored thanks to the intelligent script and the gripping acting. The movie will very likely not find much of an audience outside of Britain, but it deserves more than that.
Previous Day           The Beginning           Next Page

Paparazzi outside the Lumiere
Previous Day           The Beginning           Next Page

Intro/Day One     Day Two     Day Three     Day Four     Day Five     Day Six    
Day Seven     Day Eight     Day Nine     Day Ten     Reviews     Pictures